Bisazza cement tiles

by | Jul 25, 2019 | Flooring | 0 comments

Flee away from convention and contemplate cement tiles for floors and walls, also known as encaustic cement tiles. See how the eye-catching patterns of the floor your space will add life and breathe heritage into a contemporary space.
Cement tiles belong to 19th century Europe, where they were developed and then used widely in Art Nouveau architecture.

At Present, however, cement tiles are once again becoming a flooring as well as walls decorating choice, driven by the boom in all things vintage and the growing admiration for handmade products worldwide. While traditional cement tile designs are enjoying an amelioration, new patterns are also gaining in popularity. Manufacturers and Designers are updating these tiles with contemporary geometric patterns, old Flower Patterns, etc. giving them a second life through a more versatile look.

From modern geometric designs to quintessential motifs, these contemporary cement tiles bring stupendous new possibilities to interior design.

1. PAOLA NAVONE

In the early 19th and 20th century, colourful cement tiles dazzled the floors of palaces and mansions. Taking notes from the ancient history, Italian tile maker Bisazza has tapped top designers. One of them is Paola Navone to create contemporary riffs on the handmade tradition. Made by blending colourful oxides with durable cement, the tiles take on a cool matte texture that feels modern and chic.

Navone lent her signature punch to the series using blocks, stars, and spots in a palette of chocolate, grey, and teal. ‘Although cement tiles use a very different language to glass mosaics, we have looked for a way of tying them in with the Bisazza style,’ she adds.

This design is by Paola Navone, whose designs are the most playful of the collection.

HEXAGONAL

COLOURS AND PATTERNS:

SQUARE

COLOURS AND PATTERNS:

2. JAMIE HAYON

What’s so peculiar about Jaime Hayon’s designs are the countless combinations offered by the arrangement of the tiles. They create a rich array of textures and breath-taking geometrical figures that seem to go on forever and convey a sense of continuity and movement between different spaces. Hayon conveyed his hallmark fun-loving spirit with squiggly lines and vivid geometrics. Because of the graphic nature of the collection, the larger motif transforms depends on the placement of each tile.

 

HEXAGONAL

COLOURS AND PATTERNS:

SQUARE

COLOURS AND PATTERNS:

3. TOM DIXON

In contrast, Tom Dixon’s patterns are much more urban and ‘pop’ in nature, as is usually the case with the British designer. “With this type of collection, we’ve tried to offer a contemporary and sophisticated take on traditional cement tiles, combining the attributes of modern design with the appeal of a handmade product,” says Rosella Bisazza, daughter of the firm’s founder and its communications director.

HEXAGONAL

COLOURS AND PATTERNS:

SQUARE

COLOURS AND PATTERNS:

4. DAVID ROCKWELL

When it comes to elegant tiled surfaces, Bisazza’s offering is the one to beat. The Italian design company’s latest undertaking is an inspired collaboration with the renowned American designer David Rockwell – the first American on Bisazza’s books. Comprised of a suite of graphic patterns that are available in four colour families, Rockwell’s ’Tonal’ collection brings a contemporary slant to Bisazza’s artistic ’Cementiles’ collection.

 

Rockwell’s tonal collection is heavy on pattern with stripes, grids, and zigzags playing a major role. The palette includes four colourways, ranging from warm neutrals to cool, and intended for some freewheeling in-house experimentation be it on the floor or wall. Within these parameters, Rockwell created a set of graphic patterns, ranging from bold chromatic stripes to a vivid end grain, which can be combined in a myriad of ways.

 

The colour palettes – a sepia-toned warm neutral, charcoal cool neutral, a family of rust and then the blues – enhance the matte finish of the tiles to provide latent energy and sense of movement to the larger environment.

 

SQUARE

COLOURS AND PATTERNS:

5. FERNANDO AND HUMBERTO CAMPANA

The Agate gemstone commonly found in Brazil provided the inspiration for these handmade tiles, designed by Fernando and Humberto Campana for Italian brand Bisazza. Their focus was to capture both “the richness of Brazil and the immense fortune of petrified crystals”. “When Bisazza invited us to do this project, I decided to bring something from my country,” said Humberto Campana, speaking to Dezeen at a launch event during Milan design week.

“There is a shop nearby my studio of Brazilian stones,” he continued. “I go very often to observe, whenever I’m feeling stressed. I’m fascinated by the colours.”

Agate stones are typically found within volcanic rocks. Their coloured bands are made up of alternating layers of crystalline quartz and chalcedony, which is a form of silica.

Brazilian agate typically features brown shades, along with white and grey tones.

The stones are often dyed before being used as ornaments – and the Campanas’ tiles reflect this. Created by blending high-strength cement with coloured oxides, they come in hues of green, yellow, red and blue.

The tiles are square, measuring 20 centimeters wide. This means they can be orientated differently to create more random patterns.

SQUARE

COLOURS AND PATTERNS:

6. CARLO DAL BIANCO

Alongside the Bisazza Design Studio, three world-class designers were invited to contribute to this major new collection. One of these is Carlo Dal Bianco, whose creations are defined by a more classic inspiration, with a dash of the contemporary. Dal Bianco has developed twenty-six designs in total, each with numerous colour variations, and all incredibly beautiful. Dal Bianco kept things a tad more traditional with classic floral and tumbling blocks patterns. Made entirely by hand using high-strength cement blended with coloured oxides, the range is available in square (20×20 cm) or hexagonal (20×23 cm) configurations.

HEXAGONAL

COLOURS AND PATTERNS:

SQUARE

COLOURS AND PATTERNS:


If you’re planning to give cement tiles a try this year, go for it! Also, feel free to let us know what your thoughts are on this incredible trend, and whether these ideas were helpful!

Pin It on Pinterest